I am an Amazon.com Affiliate, and I warmly invite you to shop using my store!

Thursday, March 08, 2007

Pudding on the hits

I actually sat and ate lunch with my kids in the cafeteria today. Or rather, I WATCHED them eat, since I had plans to eat later. So when the kid across from me, A, said that he did not like chocolate pudding and offered me his, I graciously accepted. Which led to the person next to me giving me his pudding. And then the girl on my other side. And before I knew it, I had a pudding pyramid in front of me. By the time we left the cafeteria, I had a sack full of at least 15 pudding packs.

So you're probably thinking -- man, I know what HE'LL be doing during spring break!!


On Monday, I taught the boys how to play Knockout. This is a fast-moving game involving two basketballs and its fair share of coordination. I noticed that whenever someone would make a shot (or often, just when someone would TAKE a shot), several of the boys would shout, "SWAGGER!”

Don't ask me why, I had certainly never heard this before. But it made me want to see if I could get them to start saying something nonsensical.

So on Tuesday, every time I made a shot, I shouted, "Picante!!” With the emphasis in the middle.

Pih- KHAN-tay!!!

Pretty soon, I started getting some strange looks. So I followed it up with, "That's what we used to say in the old days."

By the end of recess, a couple of the boys were tentatively proclaiming, "Khan-tay!”

In fact, someone even said Picante during math class today.

I tell you, it's a good thing I use my powers for the forces of good…

5 comments:

SciGuy said...

That's hilarious! I'm going to start using the interjection "Pih- KHAN-tay!!!" whenever possible in my classes.

If it'll work with 3rd graders it will work with 7th graders... trust me.

Phin said...

Nice work on the pudding snacks. Fifteen of those bad boys might last you a couple days.

If the origin story for picante is ever questioned I propose the following:
When the Aztecs first started playing ball, a game they called tlachtli, they used human heads for balls. Although hard to dribble and often times slippery, Picante was the Harlem Globetrotter like circus antics they performed which ended with the ball exploding a-la-Gallagher. Shouts of Picante would start in the crowd as a dull thrum and gradually increase into a deafening crescendo.
True story.

MissMTeach said...

this made me laugh so hard.

Mister Teacher said...

MissM, did you laugh so hard that pudding came out of your nose??

And Phin, it's really bizarre, because that is EXACTLY the story that I told the kids yesterday!! Weird.

Anonymous said...

I love the "Picante" story -- it's sort of the "Tipping Point" theory in action! Every teacher should start injecting this where appropriate and let's see how long it takes to sweep the nation! Nice work on the pudding, dude.

LinkWithin

Blog Widget by LinkWithin